Afghan Taliban cancel meeting with US representative

258
Taliban

PESHAWAR: Afghan Taliban have cancelled their meeting with the US officials in Qatar, which was scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday.
According to media reports, the Afghan Taliban Qatar office members, and US special representative Zalmay Khalilzad were scheduled to meet on Wednesday in Qatar. However, according to media reports, the Taliban cancelled their meeting with the US representative over differences on agenda for the meeting.
Taliban said US wanted them to announce ceasefire while they asked them to exchange prisoners first. Taliban said date and venue for next meeting would be chosen later with mutual consensus.
“The U.S. officials insisted that the Taliban should meet the Afghan authorities in Qatar and both sides were in disagreement over declaring a ceasefire in 2019,” a Taliban source told Reuters.
“Both sides have agreed to not meet in Qatar.”
Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said earlier the two sides were still working on the technical details and were not clear on the agenda for the talks.
The U.S. Embassy in Kabul did not immediately respond to a request for comment about the cancellation.
The talks, which would have been the fourth round with U.S. special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad, would have involved a U.S. withdrawal, prisoner exchange and the lifting of a ban on movement of Taliban leaders, a Taliban leader had told Reuters.
Taliban sources said that they had demanded U.S. authorities release 25,000 prisoners and they would free 3,000, but that U.S. officials were not keen to discuss the exchange at this stage.
“We would never announce any ceasefire until and unless we achieve major gains on the ground. We have the feeling that Zalmay Khalilzad doesn’t have enough power to make important decisions,” a second Taliban official said.
The Taliban said Khalilzad would visit the United Arab Emirates, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India and China to continue the discussion. Khalilzad’s office was not available for a comment.
The Taliban have rejected repeated requests from regional powers to allow Afghan officials to take part in the talks, insisting that the United States is their main adversary in the 17-year war.
The insurgents, seeking to reimpose strict Islamic law after their 2001 ouster by U.S.-led troops, called off a meeting with U.S. officials in Saudi Arabia this week because of Riyadh’s insistence on bringing the Western-backed Afghan government to the table.
Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the UAE took part in the last round of talks in December.
Western diplomats based in Kabul said Pakistan’s cooperation in the peace process will be crucial to its success. Independent security analysts and diplomats said the neighbouring country’s powerful military has kept close ties with the Afghan Taliban.
U.S. officials have accused Pakistan of providing safe haven to Taliban militants in its border regions and using them as an arm of its foreign policy. Pakistan denies the claim.
The United States, which sent troops to Afghanistan in the wake of Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington and at the peak of the deployment had more than 100,000 troops in the country, withdrew most of its forces in 2014.
It keeps around 14,000 troops there as part of a NATO-led mission aiding Afghan security forces and hunting militants.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here